Using Yeoman in your workflow

There are tonnes of web development tools to help front-end developers these days that it can start to become overwhelming. I know I was! (Not gonna lie!). So before we begin, I thought I would go through some of the steps of using Yeoman in my web development workflow.

First you’ll need to get a clear picture on what you’d like to achieve and what your end result will be. For me, I wanted to re-design an existing static website to make it responsive (more about RWD on a future blog post).

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YeoPress Review

YeoPress: A Yeoman Generator for WordPress by Wesley Todd

I won’t go into too much detail to explain what YeoPress does but you can read more about it from the creator himself, Wesley Todd. YeoPress: A Yeoman Generator for WordPress, basically installs WordPress via the Command Line/Terminal. It’s also assuming that you’re working locally (which is a good start for developing WordPress themes). So you still need to create your database and you have to know what your database username and password will be (this is to set up your wp-config.php file) For example: Database Username: root, Database Password: empty). Be sure to check your database privileges for editing access too. The steps described by Wesley are easy to understand and the instructions set up are pretty straightforward.

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Grunt Boilerplate

What is Grunt? Grunt is a JavaScript Task Runner.

As written on Grunt JS

Why use a task runner?
In one word: automation. The less work you have to do when performing repetitive tasks like minification, compilation, unit testing, linting, etc, the easier your job becomes. After you’ve configured it, a task runner can do most of that mundane work for you—and your team—with basically zero effort.”

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How to Open Sublime Text from Mac OS X Terminal

It was brought to my attention that you can open Sublime Text via Terminal whilst watching a screencast by @James Stone on “Getting Sassy with ZURB Foundation 5 (Sass/Scss)” by typing:

subl .

Now I know what you’re thinking, well this isn’t new, you’re telling me that you can open files too?! (Duh) anyway I was on the hunt to find out how to ‘configure your bash profile etc’ but for starters, my hidden files were… hidden and therefore I couldn’t locate my ‘bash profile’.

To show your hidden files on a Mac, follow this post: “Quickly Show/Hide Hidden Files on Mac OS X Mavericks” by @Ian Lunn

So I finally came across this post by @thatpatrickguy on “Running Sublime Text from your OS X terminal” and it worked, YAY!

Sass, Command Line and a Firewall

After a year off from work (I was on maternity leave) I’m finally getting a chance to catch up on what I’ve missed from the Web Development community. One of which is CSS Preprocessors which has been around for a few years now. I won’t go into the details to describe what it is so I’ve listed a few popular and most used CSS Preprocessors.

After reading about CSS Preprocessors I’ve decided to explore and experiment with Sass based on these reasons:

“Sass makes it easier to write less CSS codes and manipulate them dynamically. It’s a great way to write more functional CSS codes and can speed up the workflow of every web developer and designer” – from 1st Web Designer

“It’s a way to simplify your CSS workflow, making development and maintenance tasks easier. For instance, have you ever had to do a find-and-replace in your stylesheet to change a particular HEX color for a particular indecisive client? Or had to open up the calculator app to figure out a column width in a multi-column design? Sass introduces new concepts such as variables, mixins, nestings and selector inheritance” – from Treehouse Blog

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